A Toolkit To Recover From Parenting Burnout

SoulAdvisor | 30 Jun 2021

Burnout is described by the World Health Organization (WHO) as “severe exhaustion caused by uncontrolled stress”. Unsurprisingly, this has become a pervasive issue among parents. During this unprecedented global pandemic, many parents have suffocated under the stress of working from home, schooling their children, and navigating a world of unknowns. While the worst days of the pandemic are hopefully behind us, the aftereffects of parenting burnout may not be.

Two psychotherapists, Ashley Graber and Maria Evans, share their expert advice for parents suffering (or recovering) from burnout in an interview-style article published by goop

Some of the key themes emerging from this article include: 

1. Create a work-life balance

According to Maria Evans, remove the expectation that ‘balance’ is attainable. Instead, focus on work-life ‘integration.’ To do so, set a schedule for yourself and your kids, and declare an end to your workday. Predictability and routine creates calm in our nervous systems. 

Don’t forget to schedule in time for self-care, too!

2. Take time for yourself

Designate 10-minute breaks in your day where you mindfully take time for yourself, suggests Evans. This could be a walk outside in the sun, a quick meditation, or mindfully sipping on that warm cup of joe. Importantly, make sure you mute your phone or email notifications – this time is for you!  

3. When you begin to feel burnout, manage it 

Graber insists on setting boundaries between your work, children, schooling, and self-care. If these boundaries become blurry, take a moment to notice why this has happened, and consciously reinforce them. 

4. Address feelings of guilt

You may be feeling guilty that you are not sufficiently available for your kids because of the many responsibilities that you may be juggling. To overcome this, Evans and Graber emphasise the importance of quality time. Schedule in a couple of minutes of mindful, quality time with your child. Stay present and focus on connecting with them in whatever way they choose. The amount of time you spend together is far less important than how you spend it. 

For access to qualified complementary health practitioners or wellness therapists, please visit our therapies page. Search by symptom, therapy, or practitioner, to find a practitioner suited to your needs. Many of our practitioners offer both in-studio and online consultations.

References

WHO | World Health Organization

Psychotherapy | SoulAdvisor

Ashley Graber and Maria Evans | corporatemindfulnessmethod.com

Small Tools to Relieve Parenting Burnout | goop

Therapies | SoulAdvisor

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