BETAThis is a new service - your feedback will help us to improve it.

BETAYour feedback will help us to improve it.

Yoga Therapy

Yoga Therapy

Individually tailored yoga practice and lifestyle changes to find true wellbeing

How can Yoga Therapy nourish your soul?

Yoga Therapy empowers individuals to progress toward improved health and wellbeing through the application of the teachings and practices of yoga. A Yoga Therapist is an experienced Yoga Teacher with additional qualifications, specialised skills and knowledge in the application of yoga within a therapeutic setting.

T.KV. Desikachar opened Krishnamacharya Yoga Mandiram in 1976 in Madras India based on the teachings of his father Krishnamacharya who taught in a traditionally therapeutic one-to-one style and has been credited with bringing yoga into worldwide awareness.  This centre has run programs for thousands of students requiring therapeutic support. Whilst Yoga Therapy is rooted in the ancient practice of yoga, it became widely known in the western world in the 1980s as the result of a study conducted by Dr. Dean Ornish. The study illustrated how the implementation of a healthy lifestyle program could reverse heart disease. 

Yoga Therapists study an additional 1000 hours to gain their qualification. Many also have other forms of therapeutic qualification such as Psychology or Physiotherapy and so use their Yoga Therapy qualification to increase their capacity to provide clients with tools to bring about healing. 

The practices of yoga traditionally include but are not limited to, asana, pranayama, meditation, mantra, chanting, mudra, ritual, and a disciplined lifestyle. Yoga Therapy is the appropriate application of these teachings and practices in a therapeutic context to support a consistent yoga practice that will increase self-awareness and engage the client/student’s energy in the direction of desired goals.

Yoga therapy is that component of the broader framework of yoga that is within the parameters of science, whereas yoga is to go beyond science and come to that which cannot be measured.

Benefits of Yoga Therapy

Yoga Therapy is very much based on the presenting individual and their particular pathway back to health, away from the many symptoms that cause humans to suffer. It provides tools for the client to incorporate in their lives and work towards their best version of self, using enhanced cognition to navigate the increasing demands of society and upcoming challenges. 

There is a continual and growing evidence base of research related to various human conditions that illustrates how Yoga Therapy works to address these, seeking their root cause and assisting the individual to come back to their natural healthy state. Whilst each individual must follow their own unique pathway, Yoga Therapy can assist in relieving symptoms related to:

  • Allergies
  • Anxiety and stress
  • Circulation
  • Clarity/Focus
  • Concentration
  • Depression
  • Digestion
  • Energy
  • Happiness
  • Immunity
  • Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)
  • Lower back pain
  • Mental health
  • Movement
  • Nervous system
  • Pain relief
  • Posture/Spine
  • Relaxation
  • Respiratory conditions
  • Respiratory conditions
  • Self-esteem
  • Sleep Issues
  • Stress management
  • Tension relief
  • Trauma
  • Vitality

What to expect from a Yoga Therapy session

A Yoga Therapy session is likely to be one-to-one but might also occur in specialist groups, such as yoga for people with breast cancer and yoga for post-traumatic stress syndrome or a group therapeutic class for those with a variety of therapeutic needs. The initial session will include an extensive assessment to determine the best applications of the teachings to progress the individual towards health and well-being. 

It’s important to note that Yoga Therapy is suitable for everybody regardless of age, fitness, state of health or belief system or prior experience of yoga.

A Yoga Therapy session usually runs for 60 to 90 minutes. You would expect to attend more than one session as you and your yoga therapist work to determine the most effective physical yoga practices, cleansing, dietary and/or breathing techniques.

According to Australian Association of Yoga Therapists a session may include yoga practices such as asana (postures), pranayama (breathwork), relaxation, meditation, mudra (energetic gestures and seals), bandha (energy locks), mantra (sacred sounds), bhavana (imagery), sankalpa (affirmation/intention), yogic lifestyle and nutrition advice according to a yoga framework, education in yoga philosophy, and other practices steeped in the yoga tradition and for which the therapist has received appropriate training, certification and registration.

Yoga therapy is a complementary modality and works as an adjunct to any existing medical framework.Yoga Therapists are not permitted to medically diagnose, send you for medical tests or give advice outside their scope of practice so please consult your medical professional for these needs. 

References

Definition of a Yoga Therapist - Yoga Australia

What is Yoga Therapy - Australasian Association of Yoga Therapy

Yoga as Therapy - yogahive.com.au

International Association of Yoga Therapists

International Association of Yoga Therapies Research papers

Yoga Therapy  Australia

Global Yoga Therapy Day

What is Yoga Therapy – The Yoga Shack

Beginnings of Yoga Therapy 

Krishnamacharya’s Legacy - The Yoga Journal

Shared Foundations for practice : The Language of Yoga Therapy

The Efficacy of Yoga as an Intervention for Chronic Low Back Pain: American Journal of Lifestyle Medicine

Research into yoga for reproductive health: Yoga Alliance

Yoga and Hypertension: A Systematic Review: Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine

Restorative yoga and metabolic risk factors: Journal of Diabetes and Its Complications

Meditation and Yoga can Modulate Brain Mechanisms that affect Behavior and Anxiety: HSS Public Access

How Does Yoga Reduce Stress? A Systematic Review of Mechanisms of Change: Health Psychology Review

Perspectives on a Gentle Yoga Intervention for Women with Major Depression: National Institutes of Health